The effects of a novel high intensity exercise intervention on established markers of cardiovascular disease and health in Scottish adolescent youth

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Duncan S. Buchan *
John D. Young
Alan D. Simpson
Non E. Thomas
Stephen-Mark Cooper
Julien S. Baker
(*) Corresponding Author:
Duncan S. Buchan | duncan.buchan@uws.ac.uk

Abstract

This study examined the effects of high intensity exercise on physical fitness components and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in youth. Forty-one participants (15-17 years) were divided into a control and an intervention (high intensity exercise, HIT) group. The HIT group (15 boys, 2 girls) performed three weekly sessions over seven weeks consisting of either four to six repeats of maximal sprint running with 20-30 s recovery. The control group (20 boys, 4 girls) continued their normal activity patterns. All participants had indices of obesity and blood pressure (BP) recorded in addition to four physical performance measures pre-and post-intervention: cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular power, sprint speed and agility. In the HIT group, significant improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness (P<0.01) and agility (P<0.05) were noted. Participants in the control group, meanwhile, experienced a significant decrease in counter movement jump performance. These findings demonstrate that brief, intense exercise interventions are useful for improving indices of physical fitness in a short period of time.

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Author Biographies

Duncan S. Buchan, University of the West of Scotland

Institute of Clinical Exercise Science & Health

Alan D. Simpson, University of the West of Scotland

Institute of Clinical Exercise Science & Health

Non E. Thomas, Swansea University

School of Human Sciences

Julien S. Baker, University of the West of Scotland

Institute of Clinical Exercise Science & Health