Colon cancer care of Hispanic people in California: Paradoxical barrio protections seem greatest among vulnerable populations

Abstract

Background: We examined paradoxical and barrio advantaging effects on cancer care among socioeconomically vulnerable Hispanic people in California.
Methods: We analyzed a colon cancer cohort of 3,877 non-Hispanic white (NHW) and 735 Hispanic people between 1995 and 2005. A third of the cohort was selected from high poverty neighborhoods. Hispanic enclaves and Mexican American (MA) barrios were neighborhoods where 40% or more of the residents were Hispanic or MA. Key analyses were restricted to poor neighborhoods.
Results: Hispanic people were more likely to receive chemotherapy (RR = 1.18), especially men in Hispanic enclaves (RR = 1.33) who were also advantaged on survival (RR = 1.20). A survival advantage was also suggested among MA men who resided in barrios (RR = 1.80).
Conclusions: The findings were supportive of Hispanic paradox and barrio advantage theories, further suggesting that such advantages are greater for men due to their greater familial supports.

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Published
2020-07-22
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Brief Reports
Supporting Agencies
This study was supported in part with funds from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and an Ontario Graduate Scholarship
Keywords:
Hispanic paradox, Hispanic enclave, barrio advantage, poverty, colon cancer
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How to Cite
Escobar, K. M., Gorey, K. M., Sivaram, M., Luginaah, I. N., Kanjeekal, S. M., & Wright, F. C. (2020). Colon cancer care of Hispanic people in California: Paradoxical barrio protections seem greatest among vulnerable populations. Journal of Public Health Research, 9(3). https://doi.org/10.4081/jphr.2020.1696