Vitamin D status, bone mineral density and mental health in young Australian women: the Safe-D study

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Emma T. Callegari (1*), Nicola Reavley (2), Suzanne M. Garland (3), Alexandra Gorelik (4), John D. Wark (5), on behalf of the Safe-D study team (6)

1 Department of Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.
2 Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.
3 Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Royal Children’s Hospital, Parkville; Royal Women’s Hospital, Parkville; The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.
4 Melbourne EpiCentre, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia.
5 Department of Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Parkville; Bone and Mineral Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Australia.
6 Melbourne, Australia.
(*) Corresponding Author:
Emma T. Callegari
emmatc@student.unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

Background. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with both poor bone health and mental ill-health. More recently, a number of studies have found individuals with depressive symptoms tend to have reduced bone mineral density. To explore the interrelationships between vitamin D status, bone mineral density and mental-ill health we are assessing a range of clinical, behavioural and lifestyle factors in young women (Part A of the Safe-D study).
Design and methods. Part A of the Safe-D study is a cross-sectional study aiming to recruit 468 young females aged 16-25 years living in Victoria, Australia, through Facebook advertising. Participants are required to complete an extensive, online questionnaire, wear an ultra-violet dosimeter for 14 consecutive days and attend a study site visit. Outcome measures include areal bone mineral measures at the lumbar spine, total hip and whole body, as well as soft tissue composition using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Trabecular and cortical volumetric bone density at the tibia is measured using peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Other tests include serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, serum biochemistry and a range of health markers. Details of mood disorder/s and depressive and anxiety symptoms are obtained by self-report. Cutaneous melanin density is measured by spectrophotometry.
Expected impact. The findings of this cross-sectional study will have implications for health promotion in young women and for clinical care of those with vitamin D deficiency and/or mental ill-health. Optimising both vitamin D status and mental health may protect against poor bone health and fractures in later life.

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How to Cite
Callegari, E., Reavley, N., Garland, S., Gorelik, A., Wark, J., & the Safe-D study team, on behalf of. (2015). Vitamin D status, bone mineral density and mental health in young Australian women: the Safe-D study. Journal of Public Health Research, 4(3). https://doi.org/10.4081/jphr.2015.594